Gurindji Janginyina ( Lightning at Gurindji ) by Sarrita King

Sarrita King has always been inspired by the world around her. Much of her interpretation of the natural world and its elements has come from her father, the late William King. William was an amazing artist who had a gift in connecting people with the world through his art.

Sarrita explains,’ My art connects me with my father, my culture and the world around me. Painting connects with me past , helps me focus in the moment and takes me forward with the continuous connection with others.’

Growing up in Darwin in Australia’s Northern Territory, Sarrita was close to her Gurindji country that her ancestors inhabited. The rolling sand hills, crackling lightning and thunderstorms, torrential rain, fire, desert and tangled bush are all characteristics of the brutal landscape that shaped her forefathers’ lives and also her own. Sarrita’s connection to the land and her Aboriginality were able to flourish, and her strong sense of self and pride fuels her drive to paint her totemic landscape today.

Her aesthetic has a universal appeal and provides an entry point for people to experience the power and uniqueness of the Australian landscape and its harsh environment. By depicting the environmental elements in her paintings, King provides a visual articulation of the earth’s language.

At only 29, King has had many personal achievements, including over 30 exhibitions and has been acquired by many high-profile Australian and international art collections, as well as being auctioned many times successfully through Paris’ Artcurial auction house.

The future looks bright for Sarrita, as her desire to visually communicate her inspiration and the land has resulted is works that are vibrant, striking and contemporary.

why we LOVE this artwork

This painting is inspired by her Gurindji ancestors and the great storms found in their land. One of Sarrita's first memories is of the storms and lightning found in the top end of Australia. Sarrita remembers the movement through the rain and wind and also the energy present.

This is part of an exquisite new body of work by Sarrita that can be viewed online here. The swirling background colours really do give a fantastic sense of movement, as well as providing a beautiful depth and mood. We really recommend 'home trialling' one of these  gorgeous new works, as they are highly versatile and can work in an array of settings. Not in Sydney? We can always do a 'digital hang' for you! Simply send through images of the space and we will send the images back with the artwork hanging on your wall.


Atnwengerrp Revisited | 20 May - 12 June

Sacred, traditional, historical and ceremonial elements are interwoven in a dynamic family show featuring Barbara Weir, Charmaine Pwerle, Teresa Purla and Lizzie Pwerle. Barbara and her family continue to push boundaries, experimenting with different painting styles and techniques in this latest body of work.

What makes this exhibition particularly exciting is that Barbara Weir, Teresa Purla and Lizzie Pwerle will be in the gallery on Saturday 20 May for the opening, and then take part in a two week artist in residence program!

We warmly invite visitors to the gallery to sit down, have a yarn with Barbara, Teresa and Lizzie and learn more about their art, culture and incredible life stories.

Please Note: Lizzie Pwerle is a particularly shy woman and English is her fourth language, so please don't be offended if she is a little reserved
 

Barbara, Teresa and Lizzie will be here for National Sorry Day (26 May) and National Reconciliation Week (27 May - 3 June) and will be taking part in local community events.

Barbara Weir, Teresa Purla & Lizzie Pwerle will be in the gallery

20 May – 4 June

12 - 4 Mondays, Thursdays & Fridays 

11 - 5 Weekends

Can't visit the gallery? You can view the exhibition online.


Lockhart River Mob | 18 March - 9 April

It is with great excitement that we introduce a new stable of artists to Kate Owen Gallery with our inaugural exhibition, Lockhart River Mob.

The artists come from Sandbeach Culture and Community; five distinct clan groups that live in one of the most precious natural environments on the east coast of Far North Queensland. Here you will find the healthiest section of the Great Barrier Reef, mangroves and river systems that pattern the coastal region, rainforest, red dirt roads and rock art.

In many of the artists’ work you can see how they use their detailed and graphic knowledge of the local flora, fauna and landscape and interpret it as an aesthetic pattern; using line, tone and texture to create expressionistic and abstract works that convey the character and sense of their country, with an elevated sense of mood and emotion.

What is remarkable about this exhibition is the diversity of styles, and yet the artworks always circle back to the identity of Sandbeach community; intertwining art and tradition as a cultural and personal expression from the artists own unique perspectives.

The unique context that formed the backdrop for the genesis of art from this region helps explain the diversity of styles.  The Lockhart River Art movement is a distinctly 21st century approach to cultural and environmental expression, created by a new generation of artists. The founding Lockhart River artists are known as ‘The Art Gang’ – a group of young people who did not have the same responsibility of inherited iconography of traditional visual culture, passed down to contemporary artists. Instead, art making in Lockhart was a learning process before anything else; embedded in educational and vocational opportunities for children. 

Elders encouraged any efforts to keep culture strong while expanding vocational potential and, in many instances, artists were learning cultural traditions, sometimes for the first time, at the same time as they were learning their craft. In this regard the artists and their art were in a constant state of transformation; they were taking the old ways and transforming them into new ways.

Broad community support for the education and advancement of young people in ways that once would have been considered culturally inappropriate helps explain how the Lockhart Gang broke through inside and outside their community with their new and original approach. Regardless of how one seeks to explain it, the artworks from the five artists in this exhibition speak for themselves and for a community willing to embrace something different, interesting, fresh and bold.

Lockhart River Mob introduces the exciting, confident and vigorous art from five superstars of the Lockhart River 

ONLINE EXHIBITION will be live from 18 March


ROSELLA NAMOK

Rosella was the first Lockhart River artist to have a solo show, at Hogarth Galleries in 1999, and since then has had regular exhibitions in Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney.

Rosella’s depictions of the monsoonal rains in her tropical homeland may be the most representational in her abstract oeuvre, but they also capture the psychological impact of the downpour; from the joyous light misty rain to the dense engulfing deluge.

In Early Shower Rain, we can also see the influence of Rosella’s silk-screen background – the pull of carefully selected colours suggest the form of the landscape and allows for a certain degree of relaxed contemplation in her imagery.

In Old Girls... Yarn at Night Time, Rosella paints with her fingers, an adaptation of the way that women elders pull their fingers through the sand while yarning. Each panel has a character of its own, and yet they have a tonal and formal coherence. One feels impelled to read each panel as one of the group of women who gather to yarn about their life and the community and to pass on knowledge to the younger generation.

Another preoccupation in Rosella’s body of work are her clan artworks – where she uses line and circle to express the complex kinship systems in Sandbeach. She takes the complexities and dynamics of everyday life as her inspiration and represents them in a visual abstraction that effectively maintains the essential idea.

Rosella’s works are currently held in private and public collections both nationally and internationally including the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA and Columbus State University, Georgia, USA.


FIONA OMEENYO

Fiona appeared on the contemporary art scene in the late 1990s as part of ‘The Art Gang’ – first exhibiting her work in 1998. She had her first solo show in 2001 in Broome, Western Australia. Fiona’s work was featured in Story Place: Indigenous Art of Cape York and the Rainforest at the Queensland Art Gallery in 2003.

The Quinken figures found in Sandbeach rock art dominate Fiona’s art and reveals the Lockhart River Mob’s new thinking about traditions and conventions; how Indigenous Australian cultural traditions are regenerated and renewed. Fiona is very skilled in conveying how the past is embedded in the present, with many of her figures appearing to emanate from the stream of life running behind them. In other examples of her work, the Quinken figures are inverted; suggesting that the past generations exist amidst their descendants in the present.

Fiona’s work has been widely exhibited in Australian galleries since winning her first art award in 2001, and she has had 14 solo exhibitions and over 40 group exhibitions, as well as being represented in many private and public collections including the National Gallery of Victoria and QUT Art Museum.

SAMANTHA HOBSON

Samantha’s first solo show was at Andrew Baker Art Dealer in Brisbane in 2000 and has had regular solo exhibitions since. She was awarded second prize for painting and second prize for works on paper at the 2001 Laura Festival. Her work was prominently featured in Story Place: Indigenous Art of Cape York and the Rainforest at the Queensland Art Gallery in 2003 and in Contemporary Encounters at the National Gallery of Victoria in 2010.

Samantha has an incredible ability to capture the colour and intensity of a moment and transform its radiant energy into an emotional charge pulsating through the artwork. Hot Hot Day transports you an exhaustive topical heat wave, while Cyclone Yasi captures the uncontrollable force of the very powerful and destructive tropical cyclone that hit North Queensland in 2011.

Art Historian Sally Butler perfectly explains her work as “close to abstract expressionism, but there is always something that keeps it in touch with visible reality. This is because her art is about seeing the world, not a way of imagining it”

Samantha has an extensive list of solo and group exhibitions, as well as being acquired by a number of private and public collections including the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, the National Museum of Scotland, Queensland Art Gallery, and the The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of the University of Virginia, USA.


SILAS HOBSON

Silas Hobson started painting in 1996 and is a member of The Art Gang. His first solo exhibition was in 2002 in Brisbane and since then has exhibited extensively throughout Australia in solo and group exhibitions.

Many of Silas’ figures drift between states of human and supernatural appearance – floating above a repetitive wave of colour which gives the works a syncopated beat. Silas’ art captures the energy of dance and ceremony. Silas explains that a lot of his work is about coming together.

A large number of solo and group exhibitions including Silas’ artworks have been displayed around Australia and internationally, including exhibitions in Italy, France, the UK and the United States. His work hangs in the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of NSW, the Queensland Institute of Technology Odgeroo Collection, the Flinders University Collection, the ATSIC Permanent Collection, the Wollongong University Permanent Collection and the Queensland Art Gallery. Silas also has an impressive list of awards and fine art workshops to his CV.


IRENE NAMOK

Irene Namok is not one of the founding ‘Art Gang’ members, but she carries on the Lockhart River mob’s approach to art making; negotiating one’s inherited traditions on one’s own terms in distinctive and innovative ways. Interestingly, Irene is the mother of Rosella Namok, which further emphasises that the Lockhart River Art movement originated from the younger generation. Although she came to painting later in life she has already received much acclaim. Her very first series of nine works sold out as part of a group Lockhart River exhibition at emerge ART SPACE in 2009 in Perth and she is becoming highly sought after.

Irene usually depicts emotional responses to the beautiful views and lookouts at Sandbeach, as well as her favourite fishing spots. Her paintings are a rich interplay of texture and colour, evoking the feelings of her subject matter and fascinating the viewer with seemingly endless depths and layers.

Irene has participated in many successful solo and group exhibitions including exhibitions at the Booker Lowe Gallery in Texas USA (2010) and Redot Fine Art Gallery, Singapore (2014).

 


Home is Where the ART is!

If you follow us on Facebook or Instagram, you would have seen our posts about one of our clients being featured in this month's issue of Home beautiful magazine!  

I don't know about you, but I think Sarrita King's Ancestors piece adds such a beautiful sophistication to the space :-)

Many of our clients are in the process of making their house a home, and a work of art is usually the finishing touch to make the space sing.  Unlike some galleries that may look coldly on emphasising how the work of art will sit in the home space, we think everyone deserves a beautiful work of art that reflects their taste and aesthetic. You'll be the one viewing the artwork everyday, and we want it to be a source of tremendous joy!

Our friendly, informative art consultants and gallery services are here to help you find the perfect piece - but to get the creative juices flowing we've selected a couple of new works and pieces from our latest exhibition, and placed them in a number of different settings. While the stories depicted in these artworks are incredibly ancient, they are somehow able to blend traditional iconography with a distinctive contemporary aesthetic.

Our Current Exhibition, Journey Tracks | Tony Sorby is hanging in the Charcoal gallery, but his art looks fantastic against a white wall as well. In this lounge room setting, Tony Sorby's Journey Tracks to Sacred Water Sites marries all of the hues found in the space.  

Whereas in this minimal black and white urban setting, Sorby's artwork is the 'pop of colour' and adds warmth to what would have been an incredibly stark feeling in the room.   


Journey Tracks To Sacred Sites
 

Our Newest Australian Aboriginal Art page has a selection of gorgeous pieces hand picked by our director from last year's Desert Mob in Alice Springs - a beautiful eclectic mix of artworks that can work in a range of settings.

Meredith Treacle's piece looks fantastic in this neutral lounge setting - subtly picking up colours from the timber floor

And this eclectic boho setting sings with Carol Steven's joyous work

Rhoda Tjitayi's artwork hung on the portrait orientation gives the perfect amount of colour to this Scandinavian styled inspired setting 

And Mona Mitaikiki Shepherd's artwork emphasises the high ceilings and adds warmth to the space 

Why not take a painting or two home for a few days to see how it works in your space - this is what we call our 'Home Trial' service and you can learn a lot about your taste this way. Like music, some art takes time to get to know. The best art reveals itself slowly.... We let you have time.

Want to view all of the newest artworks? Click Here

Or you can browse by price range here.